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How a Rat and Bat Helped Heal a 90-Year Cultural Rift

Tyrone Lavery, postdoctoral researcher at the Field Museum in Chicago, traveled nearly 8,000 miles to find two species–a giant rat and a monkey-faced bat–in Malaita, one of the Solomon Islands’ largest provinces. The search for these mammals isn’t over yet–but in partnership with the Kwaio, an indigenous people in Malaita, and fellow Australians Tim Flannery...

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Media Portrayals of Black Men Contribute to Police Violence, Rutgers Study Says

Negative portrayals in the news media affect how police treat black men in the United States, according to a Rutgers School of Public Health study. The study appears in the book Research in Race and Ethnic Relations. The study was based on the premise that public perceptions of male dangerousness are a factor in influencing police...

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Views of Ideal Female Appearance in China Are Changing

Young women in China, living in a rapidly changing society with more personal independence, disposable income and exposure to Western media than ever before, are also altering their views of female beauty. “The beauty industry is booming in China, and these young women I interviewed in focus groups are really endorsing the Anglo-European image of...

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Get Dressed!

Putting on clothes is a daily, mundane task that most of us perform with little or no thought. We may never take into consideration the multiple steps and physical motions involved when we’re getting dressed in the mornings. But that is precisely what needs to be explored when attempting to capture the motion of dressing...

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A World Without Brick-And-Mortar Stores? Even Avid Online Shoppers Say, ‘No, Thanks’

It has been dubbed the “retail apocalypse” – the widespread shuttering of brick-and-mortar stores across America in the wake of online shopping’s skyrocketing popularity. But how do consumers feel about this changing retail landscape? University of Arizona researcher Sabrina Helm decided to find out in a new study published in the Journal of Retailing and Consumer...

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Move Over CEOs: Designers Have Arrived in Corporate Boardrooms

Design is heading to a corporate boardroom near you. Its form is not a chair, handbag or technology. It is human. This new type of designer is equally comfortable in a navy suit or black turtleneck. Fuelled by top-selling business books and management consultant reports, this latest design movement is all about customer-tailored companies thriving...

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Banksy and the Tradition of Destroying Art

When the British street artist Banksy shredded his “Girl With Balloon” after it was purchased for US$1.4 million at Sotheby’s, did he know how the art world would react? Did he anticipate that the critics would claim that the work, in its partially shredded state, would climb in value to at least $2 million? That...

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New Findings Add Twist to Screen Time Limit Debate

For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics had suggested a limit of two hours a day of TV for children and teens. But after screen time started to include phones and tablets, these guidelines needed an update. So last year, the American Academy of Pediatrics changed its recommendations: No more than one hour of screen...

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Why Are Some Americans Changing Their Names?

In 2008, Newsweek published an article on then-presidential candidate Barack Obama titled “From Barry to Barack.” The story explained how Obama’s Kenyan father, Barack Obama Sr., chose Barry as a nickname for himself in 1959 in order “to fit in.” But the younger Barack – who had been called Barry since he was a child...

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Why Politicians Are the Real Winners in Amazon’s HQ2 Bidding War

Now that Amazon has announced the winners of its competition to host its second headquarters, a question on many minds is whether it’ll be worth the incentives offered. We have a different question: Why did so many cities play Amazon’s billion-dollar bidding game in the first place? One media narrative has portrayed the leaders of...