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How On-Screen Representations of Professions Have Changed Over 70 Years
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How On-Screen Representations of Professions Have Changed Over 70 Years

Across 70 years of data on media subtitles for television and film, architecture and engineering are the most positively portrayed professions, whereas sales-related professions fare worst, find the authors of a new study published in PLOS ONE. Probing media depictions of professions can highlight stereotypes or discrimination. It can also underscore trends in career choices:...

Ancient Art Meets AI for Better Materials Design
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Ancient Art Meets AI for Better Materials Design

Ancient Japanese art of kirigami guides artificial intelligence (AI) technique for durable, wearable electronics. Kirigami is the Japanese art of paper cutting. Likely derived from the Chinese art of jiǎnzhǐ, it emerged around the 7th century in Japan, where it was used to decorate temples. Still in practice today, the kirigami artist uses one piece of paper...

5 Facts to Take You Deeper into Botticelli’s “Allegory of Spring”
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5 Facts to Take You Deeper into Botticelli’s “Allegory of Spring”

Sando Botticelli’s Primavera, or Allegory of Spring, painted in the ‎late fifteenth century, is one of the most admired, yet controversial, paintings in the world. A perennial celebration of the most vibrant season, it evokes the spirit of spring through its depictions of figures from classical mythology. Standing in a grove, from left to right, we can see...

Security Guards Curate Exhibit at Baltimore Museum of Art
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Security Guards Curate Exhibit at Baltimore Museum of Art

Museums don’t usually need seventeen curators to mount one exhibit, but that’s how many worked on an eclectic new show at the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA). Exclusively curated by museum guards, Guarding the Art features nearly thirty works of art handpicked from the BMA’s collection. “Our security officers spend more time in our galleries and living among our...

‘Ukrainian Culture Is Alive as Long as There Are People Ready to Defend It’
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‘Ukrainian Culture Is Alive as Long as There Are People Ready to Defend It’

Every day I open Facebook and see the same picture: Hanna Sherman, the editor-in-chief of Antiquarian magazine, photographs her feet in cosy slippers against the backdrop of an ordinary Kyiv kitchen. Every morning she posts a new snapshot, taken from about the same angle. I already recognise the items in Hanna’s kitchen. A table, a TV above...

¿Que te inspira?
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¿Que te inspira? + Boris Ostrerov

Rarely do we get to explore new original art. Most of the works we experience in galleries, museums, and private collections are heavily inspired by previously created works, which of course inspires future artists. We met artist Boris Ostrerov over a decade ago and while he is consistent with his style, he continues to innovate...

Dealer Suspected of Selling Looted Antiquities to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Louvre Abu Dhabi Detained in Paris
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Dealer Suspected of Selling Looted Antiquities to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Louvre Abu Dhabi Detained in Paris

Roben Dib, the dealer suspected by US and French authorities of playing a central role in the sale of allegedly looted antiquities to museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Louvre Abu Dhabi, has been arrested in Hamburg and transferred to France to face charges. According to official sources, Dib has...

Universality Observed in Preference for Color Composition in Paintings
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Universality Observed in Preference for Color Composition in Paintings

Professor Shigeki Nakauchi’s research team at Toyohashi University of Technology worked with researchers from the University of Minho (Braga, Portugal) to examine preferences for color composition particitated by Japanese and Portuguese people for Japanese and Occidental paintings through experiments using the original paintings and paintings with artificially altered color compositions. It was discovered that regardless of nationality,...

Iowa State Designer Turns Sound into Graphics in Partnership with Maestro Guitar Pedals
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Iowa State Designer Turns Sound into Graphics in Partnership with Maestro Guitar Pedals

Keith Richards’ opening guitar riff to “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” has sent throngs of Rolling Stones crowds into screaming fits since the song debuted nearly 60 years ago. The riff introduced something else: the Maestro fuzz-tone guitar pedal. Decades later, an Iowa State University designer has expanded his research – creating visuals out of...