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Brazil’s Bolsonaro Has COVID-19 – and So Do Thousands of Indigenous People Who Live Days from the Nearest Hospital

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who has denied the severity of the coronavirus pandemic and ridiculed social distancing, tested positive for the novel coronavirus on July 7 after showing mild symptoms. Bolsonaro is one of 1.9 million confirmed COVID-19 victims in coronavirus-wracked Brazil. But as a white, wealthy and powerful man, he is not a member...

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Growth of Online Sports Betting Poses Significant Public Health Challenge

A surge in use of online sports betting platforms, and promotional tactics such as free bets to hook users in, pose a significant and growing public health challenge which needs urgent attention from policymakers, according to the author of a new academic study. Writing in the Journal of Public Health, Dr. Darragh McGee from the University...

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Obese BME People at ‘Higher-Risk’ of Contracting Covid-19

Obese people among black and minority ethnic communities (BME) are at around two times higher the risk of contracting COVID-19 than white Europeans, a study conducted by a team of Leicester researchers has found. Previous research has shown that ethnicity can alter the association between the body mass index (BMI) and cardiometabolic health so the...

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Asthma Does Not Seem to Increase the Severity of COVID-19

Asthma does not appear to increase the risk for a person contracting COVID-19 or influence its severity, according to a team of Rutgers researchers. “Older age and conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes and obesity are reported risk factors for the development and progression of COVID-19,” said Reynold...

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Cell ‘Membrane on a Chip’ Could Speed Up Screening of Drug Candidates for COVID-19

Researchers have developed a human cell ‘membrane on a chip’ that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, Cornell University and Stanford University, say their device could mimic any cell...

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35% of Excess Deaths in Pandemic’s Early Months Tied to Causes Other Than COVID-19

Since COVID-19’s spread to the United States earlier this year, death rates in the U.S. have risen significantly. But deaths attributed to COVID-19 only account for about two-thirds of the increase in March and April, according to a study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and...

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Growing Numbers of Alcohol Related Hospital Admissions Linked to Local Spending Cuts

According to the researchers, the study shows that spending cuts to alcohol services represent a false economy since decreases in expenditure are linked to increased hospital admissions which inevitably are costly to society and the economy. In March 2012 the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) transferred the responsibilities of commissioning specialist drug and alcohol...

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Respiratory Droplet Motion, Evaporation and Spread of COVID-19-Type Pandemics

It is well established that the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for the COVID-19 disease is transmitted via respiratory droplets that infected people eject when they cough, sneeze or talk. Consequently, much research targets better understanding droplet motion and evaporation to understand transmission more deeply. In a paper in Physics of Fluids, researchers developed a mathematical model, proceeding from...

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Face Mask Construction, Materials Matter for Containing Coughing, Sneezing Droplets

While the use of face masks in public has been widely recommended by public health officials during the current COVID-19 pandemic, there are relatively few specific guidelines pertaining to mask materials and designs. A study from Florida Atlantic University, in the Physics of Fluids, looks to better understand which types are best for controlling respiratory droplets...

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Lifetime Discrimination May Increase Risk of Hypertension Among African Americans

Lifetime discrimination is a chronic stressor that may increase the risk for hypertension also known as high blood pressure, in African Americans, according to new research published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. “Previous studies have shown that discrimination affects African Americans’ health; however, this research is one of the first large, community-based studies...