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Scientists Discover New Features of Molecular Elevator

Biophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the University of Groningen in the Netherlands have visualized a nearly complete transport cycle of the mammalian glutamate transporter homologue from archaea. They confirmed that the transport mechanism resembles that of an elevator: A “door” opens, ions and substrate molecules come in, the door closes,...

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Stanford Study Reveals a Holistic Way to Measure the Economic Fallout from Earthquakes

When an earthquake or other natural disaster strikes, government relief agencies, insurers and other responders converge to take stock of fatalities and injuries, and to assess the extent and cost of damage to public infrastructure and personal property. But until now, such post-disaster assessment procedures have focused on the dollar value of damages to property...

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How at Risk Are You of Getting a Virus on an Airplane?

Historic research based on group movements of humans and animals suggest three simple rules: move away from those that are too close. move toward those that are far away. match the direction of the movement of their neighbors. This research is especially used for air travel where there is an increased risk for contagious infection...

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Lab Researchers Aid COVID-19 Response in Antibody, Anti-Viral Research

  Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are combining artificial intelligence/machine learning, bioinformatics and supercomputing to help discover candidates for new antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs to combat COVID-19. Backed by five high performance computing (HPC) clusters and years of expertise in vaccine and countermeasure development, a COVID-19 response team of LLNL researchers from various...

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Why Is an Empty Shampoo Bottle So Easy to Knock Over?

It becomes annoyingly easy to knock over a shampoo bottle when it’s nearly empty. This is an easily observed and curiosity-provoking phenomenon that, according to Lehigh University physics professor Jerome Licini, yields insights into center-of-mass and impacts. “The physics of that is pretty interesting and easy to understand,” says Licini who, along with first-year physics major...

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Speak Math, Not Code

Have you ever followed a recipe to bake some bread? If you have, congratulations; you have executed an algorithm. The algorithms that follow us around the internet to suggest items we might like, and those that control what shows up in our Facebook feeds may seem mysterious and uncanny at times. Yet, an algorithm is...

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Solar Storms Could Scramble Whales’ Navigational Sense

When our sun belches out a hot stream of charged particles in Earth’s general direction, it doesn’t just mess up communications satellites. It might also be scrambling the navigational sense of California gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus), causing them to strand on land, according to a Duke University graduate student. Many animals can sense the Earth’s...

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Out-Of-Context Photos Are a Powerful Low-Tech Form of Misinformation

When you think of visual misinformation, maybe you think of deepfakes – videos that appear real but have actually been created using powerful video editing algorithms. The creators edit celebrities into pornographic movies, and they can put words into the mouths of people who never said them. But the majority of visual misinformation that people...

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Thwarting Hacks by Thinking Like the Humans Behind Them

If we understood the humans behind hacking incidents – and their intent – could we stop them? Research from Michigan State University reveals the importance of factoring in a hacker’s motive for predicting, identifying and preventing cyberattacks. Most people tend to focus on how to minimize the risk of a hack, from antivirus software to...