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How the Solar System Got Its ‘Great Divide,’ and Why It Matters for Life on Earth

Scientists, including those from the University of Colorado Boulder, have finally scaled the solar system’s equivalent of the Rocky Mountain range. In a study published yesterday in Nature Astronomy, researchers from the United States and Japan unveil the possible origins of our cosmic neighborhood’s “Great Divide.” This well-known schism may have separated the solar system...

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Shocked Meteorites Provide Clues to Earth’s Lower Mantle

Deep below the Earth’s surface lies a thick rocky layer called the mantle, which makes up the majority of our planet’s volume. While Earth’s mantle is too deep for humans to observe directly, certain meteorites can provide clues to this unreachable layer. In a study recently published in Science Advances, an international team of scientists,...

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Team Uses Plastic to Make Super Light 18-Carat Gold

The discovery will thrill lovers of gold watches and heavy jewelry. The objects of their desire may someday become much lighter, but without losing any of their glitter. Especially in watches, a small amount of weight can make all the difference. No one wants to wear a heavy watch on their wrist, even if it’s...

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New Study Estimates the Global Extent of River Ice Loss as Earth Warms

More than half of Earth’s rivers freeze over every year. These frozen rivers support important transportation networks for communities and industries located at high latitudes. Ice cover also regulates the amount of greenhouse gasses released from rivers into Earth’s atmosphere. A new study from researchers in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department...

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Mealworms Safely Consume Toxic Additive-Containing Plastic

Tiny mealworms may hold part of the solution to our giant plastics problem. Not only are they able to consume various forms of plastic, as previous Stanford research has shown, they can eat Styrofoam containing a common toxic chemical additive and still be safely used as protein-rich feedstock for other animals, according to a new...

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Transformative Change Can Save Humans and Nature

The survival of Earth’s life is not a battle of humans versus nature. In last week’s Science, an independent group of international experts, including one from Michigan State University (MSU), deliver a sweeping assessment of nature, concluding victory needs both humans and nature to thrive. “Pervasive human-driven decline of life on Earth points to the...

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Potentially Toxic Chemicals from LCDs in Nearly Half of Household Dust Samples Tested

Chemicals commonly used in smartphone, television, and computer displays were found to be potentially toxic and present in nearly half of dozens of samples of household dust collected by a team of toxicologists led by the University of Saskatchewan (USask). The international research team, led by USask environmental toxicologist John Giesy, is sounding the alarm...

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Mobile Devices Blur Work and Personal Privacy Raising Cyber Risks

Organisations aren’t moving quickly enough on cyber security threats linked to the drive toward using personal mobile devices in the workplace, warns a QUT privacy researcher. Dr. Kenan Degirmenci from QUT’s Science and Engineering Faculty’s School of Information Systems said workers worldwide expected to take their work with them whenever and wherever. But he warned...

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Meet the Early Internet’s Black ‘Vanguard’

Studying #BlackLivesMatter made Charlton McIlwain’s wonder about that movement’s digital predecessors. Did those 21st-century activists who turned to social media to bring attention to police brutality draw from an earlier playbook? And if so, who was the first to leverage the power of the internet in the pursuit of racial justice? The questions led McIlwain,...