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Anonymous No More: Combining Genetics with Genealogy to Identify the Dead in Unmarked Graves

In Quebec, gravestones did not come into common use until the second half of the 19th century, so historical cemeteries contain many unmarked graves. Inspired by colleagues at Barcelona’s Pompeu Fabra University, a team of researchers in genetics, archaeology and demography from three Quebec universities (Université de Montréal, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi and Université...

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A Study of Economic Compensation for Victims of Sexual Violence in Europe

In an article coming from the project, recently published in the Teoría y Derecho magazine, the efficiency of the Spanish system of economic compensation for victims of sexual violence is analysed through the two procedures aimed at this purpose: on one hand, the payment of compensations established in judgement of conviction and on the other hand, grants...

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Study Charts Rising Trend of Image-Based Sexual Abuse

Image-based sexual abuse in Australia is increasing, according to new research. A survey of more than 2000 Australians found 1 in 3 had been victims of image-based abuse, compared with 1 in 5 in 2016. The survey also found the perpetration of image-based abuse had increased, with 1 in 6 people surveyed reporting they had...

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Red Coral Effectively Recovers in Mediterranean Protected Areas

Protection measures of the Marine Protected Areas have enable red coral colonies (Corallium rubrum) to recover partially in the Mediterranean Sea, reaching health levels similar to those of the 1980s in Catalonia and of the 1960s in the Ligurian Sea (Northwestern Italy). This according to a recent study carried out by researchers from the Institute...

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Save the Giants, Save the Planet

Habitat loss, hunting, logging and climate change have put many of the world’s most charismatic species at risk. A new study, led by the University of Arizona, has found that not only are larger plants and animals at higher risk of extinction, but their loss would fundamentally degrade life on earth. The study, published in...

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New Global Biodiversity Study Provides Unified Map of Life on Land and in the Ocean

New research led by the Monterey Bay Aquarium and partner organizations yielded the first comprehensive global biodiversity map documenting the distribution of life both on land and in the ocean. The study published today in PLOS ONE offers the most complete picture available of where life occurs on Earth and what the most critical environmental factors are...

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Conflict Between Ranchers and Wildlife Intensifies as Climate Change Worsens in Chile

Scientists from the University of La Serena, Newcastle University, UK, and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile surveyed ranchers to find out what they thought were the drivers of conflict between people and guanacos (a wild camelid species closely related to the Llama). Ranchers blamed the increased aridity for reducing the availability of pasture, which...

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Is Human Cooperativity an Outcome of Competition Between Cultural Groups?

It may not always seem so, but scientists are convinced that humans are unusually cooperative. Unlike other animals, we cooperate not just with kith and kin, but also with genetically unrelated strangers. Consider how often we rely on the good behavior of acquaintances and strangers– from the life-saving services of firefighters and nurses, to mundane...

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Commercial Air Travel Is Safer Than Ever

It has never been safer to fly on commercial airlines, according to a new study by an MIT professor that tracks the continued decrease in passenger fatalities around the globe. The study finds that between 2008 and 2017, airline passenger fatalities fell significantly compared to the previous decade, as measured per individual passenger boardings —...

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Neandertals Went Underwater for Their Tools

Neandertals collected clam shells and volcanic rock from the beach and coastal waters of Italy during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study published January 15, 2020 in PLOS ONE by Paola Villa of the University of Colorado and colleagues. Neandertals are known to have used tools, but the extent to which they were able to...