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Every Third Housing Estate Resident Feels Trapped

Involuntary staying, a type of housing trap, is a common experience among people living on housing estates, since around one in three residents feel that they are trapped in their current residential arrangements. More than half of them would like to move away from their current neighbourhoods. According to the residents own estimation, the most...

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At Last, Acknowledging Royal Women’s Political Power

The narratives we tell about the past often feature a cast of familiar main characters: kings and rulers, warriors and diplomats — men who made laws and fought wars, who held power over others in their own lands and beyond. When women enter our stories, we rarely afford them much agency. But across the globe...

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High Society Wants Its Fine Foods to Also Be Ethical

Truffles and caviar have traditionally been delicacies of the upper class, but a new study by University of British Columbia (UBC) sociology professor Emily Huddart Kennedy and colleagues from the University of Toronto finds that free-range and fair-trade foods are becoming increasingly important among the elite. “Our culture’s understanding of what counts as elite taste...

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New Measure of Equality Reveals a Fuller Picture of Male Well-Being

Researchers from the University of Missouri and University of Essex in the United Kingdom say a new way of measuring gender inequality is fairer to both men and women, and presents a simplified but more accurate picture of peoples’ well-being than previous calculations. The new Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI) focuses on three factors...

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How a Rat and Bat Helped Heal a 90-Year Cultural Rift

Tyrone Lavery, postdoctoral researcher at the Field Museum in Chicago, traveled nearly 8,000 miles to find two species–a giant rat and a monkey-faced bat–in Malaita, one of the Solomon Islands’ largest provinces. The search for these mammals isn’t over yet–but in partnership with the Kwaio, an indigenous people in Malaita, and fellow Australians Tim Flannery...

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Americans Appear to be More Afraid of the President than Immigration

Immigration policy has been a central focus of President Trump’s administration since he announced his candidacy in a speech in which he said, “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime....

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Feeding 10 Billion People by 2050 Within Planetary Limits May Be Achievable

A global shift towards healthy and more plant-based diets, halving food loss and waste, and improving farming practices and technologies are required to feed 10 billion people sustainably by 2050, a new study finds. Adopting these options reduces the risk of crossing global environmental limits related to climate change, the use of agricultural land, the...

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Millennials Are So Over U.S. Domination of World Affairs

Millennials, the generation born between 1981 and 1996, see America’s role in the 21st century world in ways that, as a recently released study shows, are an intriguing mix of continuity and change compared to prior generations. For over 40 years the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, which conducted the study, has asked the American...

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Why Stereotypes of Sexy Women Fans Persist at the World Cup

Globally, women’s football fandom is on the rise, with women comprising around 40% of worldwide television audiences for the 2014 men’s football World Cup. Couple this with the growing prominence of the women’s World Cup – to be held again next year in France – and it’s clear that football mega-events are no longer just...