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How One Man Fought South Carolina Democrats to End Whites-Only Primaries – and Why That Matters Now

A rusting chain-link fence represents a “color line” for the dead in Columbia, South Carolina. In Randolph Cemetery, separated by the barrier from the well-manicured lawn of the neighboring white graveyard, lies the remains of George A. Elmore. A black business owner and civil rights activist, Elmore is little remembered despite his achievement. But a...

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New Study Offers Clues to Origin of Laws

Speculation about where laws come from ranges from crediting judges and legal scholars to God. However new research co-authored by a University of Central Florida researcher and appearing in the journal Nature Human Behaviour offers evidence that criminal laws come from an intuitive and shared, universal sense of justice that humans possess. “We sometimes think of the...

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Research Finds Support for ‘Trump Effect’

When Donald Trump formally announced his presidential candidacy in a June 2015 speech, he declared, among other comments, that “when Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” referred to Mexican immigrants as rapists, and reiterated his intention to build a wall at the border. What impact did Trump’s remarks have on normalizing expressions...

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Political TV Ads Referencing Guns Increased Eightfold Over Four Election Cycles

The number of political candidate television advertisements that refer to guns increased significantly across four election cycles in U.S. media markets, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, to be published in the February issue of Health Affairs, analyzed more than 14 million televised...

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Keeping Guns Away from Potential Mass Shooters

The United States currently averages 20 mass shootings per year. Researchers from Michigan State University measured the extent to which mass shootings are committed by domestic violence perpetrators, suggesting how firearm restrictions may prevent these tragedies. Under federal law, when people are convicted of domestic violence misdemeanor crimes, they are prohibited from purchasing and possessing...

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Inequality Is Bad for Society, Economic Prosperity Good

Rich countries vary a lot when it comes to health and social problems. A comparison of social ills ranging from intentional homicides to obesity rates in 40 rich societies shows that Asian and European countries fare much better than Anglophone and Latin American countries. The most problem-ridden countries are Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and the...

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Highlighting Women’s Achievements Makes Them Want to Be the Boss, Research Shows

Highlighting female achievements in the workplace makes capable women significantly more likely to want to be the boss, a study shows. Public feedback about a woman’s performance can significantly increase her willingness to lead, even in male-dominated environments, according to the research. The teams led by these women are subsequently more likely to perform well....

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Report Builds Framework for ‘Digital Political Ethics’ in 2020

With the 2020 elections looming and amid continuing concerns over social media’s role in U.S. politics, four top universities have published a comprehensive new report recommending how candidates, tech platforms and regulators can ensure that digital political campaigns promote and protect fair elections. The report, Digital Political Ethics: Aligning Principles with Practice, was developed by Johns Hopkins,...

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Government Regimes May Be Learning New Twitter Tactics to Quash Dissent

When protesters use social media to attract attention and unify, people in power may respond with tweeting tactics designed to distract and confuse, according to a team of political scientists. In a study of Twitter interactions during Venezuela’s 2014 protests, in which citizens voiced opposition to government leaders and called for improvements to their standard...