Science & Technology

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New Findings Add Twist to Screen Time Limit Debate

For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics had suggested a limit of two hours a day of TV for children and teens. But after screen time started to include phones and tablets, these guidelines needed an update. So last year, the American Academy of Pediatrics changed its recommendations: No more than one hour of screen...

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Clapping Music App Reveals That Changing Rhythm Isn’t So Easy

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have developed an app to understand why some rhythms are more difficult to perform than others. They collected and analyzed a huge dataset of more than 100,000 people and found that changing rhythm is more difficult than playing a complex individual rhythm. The app challenges users to play Clapping...

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When It Comes to Smartphone Lifespan, Brand Name Matters More Than Hardware

Many critics have denounced smartphone manufacturers in recent years for producing devices that quickly become obsolete, creating a “planned obsolescence” that is costly for consumers and the global environment. Yet while many consumers clamor for increased “repairability” — and thus longer lifespans — for these devices, a new Yale-led study finds that there is a...

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Research Shows Club Drug GHB Associated with Brain and Cognitive Changes

Scientists have discovered that regular use of the party drug GHB, and especially unconsciousness following GHB use, is associated with brain changes including negative effects on long-term memory, working memory, IQ, and higher levels of stress and anxiety. This work is presented at the ECNP conference in Barcelona, following partial peer-review publication*. GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate), also...

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Even When Presented with Facts, Supported by Evidence, Many Choose Not to Believe Them

In an era of fact-checking and “alternative facts,” many people simply choose not to believe research findings and other established facts, according to a new paper co-authored by a professor at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. “A growing body of evidence suggests that even when individuals are aware of research findings supported by a...

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In the Battle of Cats Vs. Rats, the Rats Are Winning

The first study to document interactions between feral cats and a wild rat colony finds that contrary to popular opinion, cats are not good predators of rats. In a novel approach, researchers monitored the behavior and movement of microchipped rats in the presence of cats living in the same area. They show the rats actively...

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Altered Images: New Research Shows That What We See Is Distorted by What We Expect to See

New research shows that humans “see” the actions of others not quite as they really are, but slightly distorted by their expectations. Published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the study could explain why people get others’ actions so wrong and see ambiguous behavior as meaningful, according to authors from the University of Plymouth School...

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How Your Brain Decides Between Knowledge and Ignorance

We have a ‘thirst for knowledge’ but sometime ‘ignorance is bliss’, so how do we choose between these two mind states at any given time? University College London (UCL) psychologists have discovered our brains use the same algorithm and neural architecture to evaluate the opportunity to gain information, as it does to evaluate rewards like...

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How Physics Explains the Evolution of Social Organization

A scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities that exhibit distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas. In a paper published June 15 in the International Journal of Energy Research, Adrian Bejan outlines...